• Learning begins as early as 13 months.
  • Emphasis on “cognitive” learning is doing hands-on tasks that demonstrate the lesson to be learned.
  • Child’s learning style determines how lessons are learned.
  • Children develop confidence in learning through physical exploration-being able to pick up, handle and manipulate learning tools.
  • Learning activities are chosen based on an ongoing assessment of the child’s abilities, interest, and need for challenges, as well as curricula demands.
  • All learning is approached from the belief that all things are connected, all actions and decisions have causes and effects, and we are responsible for caring for the environment.
  • Child sets his/her own learning pace.
  • Children choose work based on own interests and abilities and work as long as they choose.
  • Self-teaching materials designed to suit child’s natural curiosity and attention span, reward exploration, and invite repetition.
  • Mixed-age groups encourage interaction between older and younger children; older children become role models for younger children.
  • Children work where they feel comfortable, move about and talk quietly; and can choose to work together.
  • Children encouraged to teach, help, and collaborate with each other.
  • Children routinely organize time and sequence of learning activities building self-care, self-reliance and independence.
  • Students select, arrange, and implement their own projects based on curriculum. Participation in community projects is integral to Montessori education.
  • Average of 12 students per classroom teacher (children under 3 years - 1:5 or 1:7).
  • Children spend up to three years with the same teacher.
  • Teachers state-certified to teach, plus added Montessori training and certifications.
  • Teachers guide child one-on-one or in small groups through hands-on lessons, allowing child to complete as much as possible on his/her own; each child is actively learning with each activity.
  • Teacher interest/investment in each child’s emotional, social, and aesthetic needs is a key component of Montessori education. Teaching includes respect for self and others, self-control, responsibility, the importance of completing tasks, organization, and academic subjects.
  • Children get “internal” rewards (feelings of success) for learning. Children having difficulty are encouraged to try again later and redirected to another activity. Children are rewarded for efforts and completing learning tasks through objective, encouraging feedback.