Poplar

Amy Wagner

Sarah Knox

Poplar Room is a Children’s House classroom on the Toledo Campus. Sarah Knox and Amy Wagner are the classroom’s co-teachers.

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2015-16 Toledo Children’s House
Dates to Know [PDF]

Grandparents Event Cover

We cordially invite you to attend Grandparents’ and Special Friends’ Day!

This is a wonderful opportunity to spend time with the children in their classrooms. The students are always so happy and proud to share their space with loved ones. We hope that you can join us!

Q: What day should my child’s grandparent/special friend come visit?

A: We are lucky to have so many grandparents/special friends in our community! To accommodate all our visitors, we host 2 days for visits. Look for your child’s program in the list below to determine what day their guests should arrive.

Friday, May 6 -Toledo Campus
– Little House students enrolled in W-F classes
– Little House students enrolled in M-F classes
– All Children’s House students
– All students in levels 1-8 Friday,

Friday, May 6 – Perrysburg Campus
– Little House students enrolled in W-F classes

Monday, May 9 – Toledo Campus
– Little House students enrolled in M-T classes

Monday, May 9 – Perrysburg Campus
– Little House students M/T classes
– Little House students M-F classes
– All Children’s House students

Please feel free to call the offices with questions:
Toledo – 419-866-1931
Perrysburg – 419-874-9385

World Language Week cover

Please join us to celebrate World Language during the week of May 9-13!  It’s a week-long open house in our World Language classes, where family and friends are invited to attend classes and presentations at all levels. Come and see what we’re doing and learning!

World Language Week 2016 day-by-day schedule

After an amazing time at the AMS Conference in Chicago and attending some great sessions, we made a few changes to our Practical Life area.

The food prep work used to be contained on one tray per one work with all the materials needed on that tray.  However, do any of really keep our kitchens stocked like this at home?  The practical life area replicates and provides practice for gaining practical skills and independence.  With this in mind, we switched things up on our food prep shelves so now, if a child wants to cut an apple, they must think about what is needed for this work (cutting board, knife, apple slicer, bowl for the apple, an apple), gather the materials from a supply shelf, and bring these things to their work space.  From there, they can wash and cut their apple, then either eat the fruit of their labor or choose to share with friends.

Gathering materials needed for apple cutting work

Gathering materials needed for apple cutting work

Sharing apple pieces with friends is a great way to practice grace and courtesy

Sharing apple pieces with friends is a great way to practice grace and courtesy

In addition to the apple cutting work, your children have also been learning how to peel and slice cucumbers, peel and slice hard boiled eggs, squeeze fresh orange juice, and slice bananas.

Not only do children have the independence to prepare a personal snack from the food prep shelf, they have also been helping prepare snack in the mornings for the class.  This provides them with practice and understanding of doing work for the good of the community.

Washing and  cutting strawberries for the classroom snack

Washing and cutting strawberries for the classroom snack

Poplar room has been blessed with an awesome tool that our children are loving!  We received a grain mill last year and the children have been busy grinding cereal and rice into flours to be used for baking!

Using the grain mill uses gross motor strength and concentration (plus anticipation for the yummy recipes to follow!)

The grain mill uses gross motor strength and concentration (plus anticipation and delayed gratification for the yummy recipes to follow!)

I want to thank all the families that came to First Thursday today. I also want to share with you the handout (below).

Structure of the Music/Literacy Lessons

CH_MusicI start with a Music and Movement lesson for the whole class. We warm up our voices and bodies and have a lot of fun. After a couple of songs at circle I spread the children around the room so that we have space to hop, jump, and wiggle without bumping into our friends while we sing action songs. During this time, I also sing songs related to content areas that children are studying in the classroom and seasonal songs.

After singing our hearts out and shaking our sillies out we come back to the circle for the Shared Reading lesson. At this time I refer to the song I have written on chart paper, and point to each word as the students and I read the text together. Even the youngest students can be successful in this reading environment because they have already sung the song and they have the support of their classmates and me.

During work time I work with the students in small groups reading their folders. All of the students have their own folders that contain copies of the songs we have used as Shared Reading texts. This gives students the chance to read the songs independently, allowing them to make one more mental imprint of the song. Songs are illustrated to provide picture support so that even the youngest readers can be successful through recognition and recitation. They see the picture of the water, and they know it is the song, “Listen to the Water,” so they begin reciting it from memory. Emergent readers use their fingers to practice left-to-right directionality and begin tracking print. Developing readers use one-to-one correspondence, touching each word as they say it, and self-correcting when they notice that the word their finger is pointing to does not match the word they are saying. The differentiation of instruction is inherent in the activity because all of the children can approach it at their own levels and be successful.

When we work in small groups, in addition to reading our folders for independent reading, there are many other literacy extension activities that we do. For example, we did a lot of work on our names with the song “What’s Your Name” including comparing names and “letter hunting.” I sometimes ask students to illustrate a song as a comprehension activity. Other times I use “zipper songs,” asking children to fill in a blank, and “zipping” their ideas into the song. When we fill in gaps in a printed song, my expectations are different for students depending on their individual levels. I might model the writing and fill in the blanks myself, stretching out a word to listen for every sound in it. I might ask children for the initial sound of a word, or to write the word independently, depending on their abilities.

The best way for you to understand the curriculum and appreciate the incredible work the children are doing would be to come in and observe on a day when your child has Music. I am in Sassafras on Mondays, Black Cherry on Tuesdays, Perrysburg on Wednesdays, Poplar and Sycamore on Thursdays, and Maple on Fridays. Please join us. I would love to see you there!

Keep singing!

Please join Amy Wagner and me this Thursday, February 4, 8:30- 9:30 a.m. Amy will talk about the Montessori materials that support language, and I will talk about how the Music/Literacy program works. We will do a quick demonstration with some of the Children’s House students, and be available to answer questions. Hope to see you there!